Tag Archives: doormat

How to Reduce Allergies in The Home

While you’ll see a lot of news and info popping up this time of year about pollen and reducing those allergy symptoms, the truth is “allergy season” lasts all year long. For those allergic to pets, this is no surprise. There are other risks present all year round, too. Read on to learn more about how to reduce allergies in every season. According to a recent issue of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation‘s quarterly newsletter, FreshAAIRwinter allergies come mainly from indoor sources, so be on the lookout in your home for allergen hot spots. “When windows are shut and the heater is on, less fresh air is circulated through your home and exposure to indoor allergens increases.”

How to Reduce Allergies – Check These Sources

 How to Reduce Allergies in The Home

typical allergy triggers in the home.

  • Pet Dander – Particularly concerning in the winter when your pet is likely indoors most of the time, pet dander can be a major cause of allergic reaction. Cut back on dander in the home by bathing your pet often and vacuuming your floors and furniture regularly.  If your pet is the one suffering from allergies look at your cleaning supplies.  Get rid of strong smells and go with non-toxic. Sometimes just good old fashioned floor soap works best.  Remember to wipe your dogs paws and underbelly after an outdoor walk. Having a problem with the pet bed and the odors.  Switch to an antimicrobial treated floor mat. Dr. Doormat controls the growth of microorganisms and odors. Position the mat at the doggie door and other entrances. Dogs also love sleeping on the floor mat because of the way it feels and they don’t destroy it.
  • Dust Mites – As gross at it sounds, these little buggers are everywhere. If you are allergic its likely to be more the feces of the dust mite than the actual mite.  Keep your home clean with a regular schedule – wash bedding often, dust surfaces, and stay on top of laundry.
  • Furnaces and Heating Sources – Dust and allergens accumulate in the heating and air conditioning system. Keep them serviced and change filters regularly. Follow these winter indoor air tips.
  • Carpets – Avoid wall to wall carpet, but if you have carpet and are stuck with it, at least make sure it stays as clean as possible.  Keep them cleaner by wiping shoes thoroughly on Dr. Doormat as you enter the home.  The surface of the mat will help trap allergens, pesticides and toxins and disable odor causing microorganisms (bacteria, mold, fungus) on the mat.  We can’t always guarantee how well a guest will wipe so we also recommend taking shoes off after using the antimicrobial treated doormat to reduce and minimize our exposure.  Keep a shoe rack near the welcome mat.    Vacuum your carpets regularly and steam clean as needed.  Remember to sanitize the head of the vacuum cleaner before and after you vacuum to further reduce the spread of viruses and germs.
  • Ceiling Fans – Have you cleaned them lately? Use the pillowcase trick to trap dust and dispose of it outside your home!

Cutting down on allergen exposure is the key to keeping your family breathing easy. Follow these tips for a cleaner, fresher home – all year long.

May Every Step You Take Be Healthy!

Best Regards,
Debbie Greenspan's signature
Debbie Estis Greenspan
Founder/CEO/Mom
Dr. Doormat, Inc.

Avoiding the Flu – Easily Overlooked Areas

Every year like clockwork, a new strain of the Influenza virus makes its rounds, leading many people to take precautions against illness. Some get the flu shot, while others rely on more natural preventative measures.

Whether you take either of these approaches, one thing everyone needs to pay attention to is good hygiene. Practicing good hygiene can have a significant impact on inhibiting the spread of illness.

Aside from the basic practices of hand washing and staying home when sick, don’t overlook these commonly ignored sources of contamination during flu season:

  •  Avoiding the Flu   Easily Overlooked Areas

    Germs at your fingertips!

    Clean the knick-knacks. When you stop to think about it, there are a lot of little items we touch and use every day that don’t always get cleaned on a regular basis! Remote controls, car keys, your cell phone and electronics all harbor a lot of germs when they aren’t cleaned often.

  • Toys. Similarly, your kids’ toys should be cleaned on a regular basis or the germs will thrive. Involve your kids to teach them the importance of good hygiene.
  • School supplies. It’s well known among parents that illness spreads like wildfire in schools. During flu season, take extra care to avoid bringing home the bug on your kids’ school stuff. Clean out the backpack and wipe down books and supplies regularly.
  • I make it a rule that when we come home we wipe our shoes on our antimicrobial treated  doormat, put our coats and hats away and go wash our hands with soap and water.  That includes guests too.  It really helps.
  • Shop smart. Even sick people need to eat – that’s why grocery stores are an incredibly easy place to contract an illness. Wipe down your shopping cart with antibacterial cloths, wash your grocery bags often and as always, wash your food before you eat it!
  • Give the car a good clean. Vehicles are often neglected when it comes to cleaning, so take the opportunity to give it a thorough clean – there’s no better time than when an illness is going around.
  • Do not share utensils or drinking glasses. Eating in public places? Ask the waiter for a cup of boiling water and let the utensils soak for a minute or two and wipe down before using.  Why risk the obvious.  A little action and awareness can go along way in keeping the family healthy all winter long.

May Every Step You Take Be Healthy!

Best Regards,
Debbie Greenspan's signature
Debbie Estis Greenspan
Founder/CEO/Mom
Dr. Doormat, Inc.

Want Clean Indoor Air? Just Say No to Indoor Smoking!

 Want Clean Indoor Air? Just Say No to Indoor Smoking!

smoking effects all of the people and pets around you.

It’s impossible to deny the dangers associated with smoking cigarettes for both smokers and the people around them. We all know that secondhand smoke is harmful, but less obvious is just how easy it is to pollute your indoor air with cigarettes. Just one or two cigarettes will do significant damage. Even if no one in your immediate family smokes, it’s critical to set boundaries with visitors that might be smokers.

Those who are especially vulnerable to the harmful effects of secondhand smoke are small children and the elderly. While it can be awkward and feel confrontational to set these boundaries – especially with certain family members! – you protect the health of your whole family by doing so.

Shoot for Clean Indoor Air – The Dangers of Secondhand Smoke
There are some pretty alarming statistics linked to secondhand smoke alone:

  • 20-30% increased risk of heart disease
  • 20-30% increased risk of lung cancer
  • Increased risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome for babies exposed to secondhand smoke
  • More frequent ear infections in children exposed to secondhand smoke
  • Increased risk of ADHD in children exposed to tobacco smoke

Designating an Ideal Smoking Area

 Want Clean Indoor Air? Just Say No to Indoor Smoking!

A Japanese designated smoking area.

Contrary to what some people believe, opening a window does not eliminate the risks of indoor smoking in the home or vehicle. In an ideal world, no one would smoke cigarettes at all. Until that day comes, it’s wise to have a designated area for smokers to go. The ideal place is an area that diminishes the risk of others being exposed to the secondhand smoke.

The following guidelines from the EPA can help you determine where that might be near your home:

  • Should not be near any entryways, windows, or air ducts into the home.
  • Should not be near anywhere children play.
  • If outdoors, should not be anywhere where airflow directly affects entryways or windows.
  • If indoors, such as a shed or detached garage, should be well ventilated. Consider adding a smoke-reducing air purifier to indoor smoking areas.

Steps to Reduce Third Hand Smoke
It’s important to reduce exposure to third hand smoke as well. Third hand smoke is the residue left on a person’s body and clothes after smoking. We’ve all had that experience where you’re standing next to someone and you just know they are a smoker or spend a lot of time with one! That’s third hand smoke at work.

To lower that chances of third hand smoke entering the home, ask guests to wash their hands when they come in from smoking. Also, consider keeping a coat hanger just outside the door by the doormat rather than inside, to lessen the amount of third hand smoke enters the home on clothing.

Setting these boundaries with your family or other people in your life might not be the most fun thing in the world to do, but your home will be a much healthier place to be when all is said and done!

May Every Step You Take Be Healthy!

Best Regards,
Debbie Greenspan's signature
Debbie Estis Greenspan
Founder/CEO/Mom
Dr. Doormat, Inc.