Tag Archives: bacteria

Impetigo: What You Need to Know

Impetigo is a bacterial skin infection more common in children than adults. It’s highly contagious and is more common during the warm, humid months of the year. While impetigo isn’t serious, it is unpleasant to deal with. Here’s what you need to know.

Recognizing Impetigo

Impetigo occurs in two forms: Bullous and Non-bullous. Non-bullous impetigo is more common and is caused by the Staphylococcus (staph) and Streptococcus (strep) strains of bacteria.

MedicineNet offers a comparison and photos of both types of Impetigo.

Impetigo can often look like other types of skin rashes, including poison ivy, chicken pox, and eczema. A culture test can determine whether or not a rash is impetigo if visual observation doesn’t suffice.

Causes and Prevention

Insect bites and flesh wounds can lead to impetigo, especially if they are not kept clean or “left alone.” For example, scratching mosquito bites (especially with dirty nails!) is one way a lot of people become infected. Animal bites can also lead to impetigo quite easily without proper wound care. And of course, impetigo is very contagious between humans.

It can be difficult to keep impetigo from spreading, as it’s highly contagious – especially among family members or anyone else in close quarters. Skin to skin contact, or even contact with the same towels or bedding can spread the infection. Children can also easily spread the infection to other families in day care centers, schools, and swimming pools. It’s good to stay home if you have this rash to avoid infecting others.

Routine hand washing is an important preventative measure, as with most types of infections!

May Every Step You Take Be Healthy!

Best Regards,
Debbie Greenspan's signature
Debbie Estis Greenspan
Founder/CEO/Mom
Dr. Doormat, Inc.

Is Your Water Source Safe?

We all know that in order to be healthy, we need to drink plenty of water to stay hydrated. But when it comes to the water supply in various parts of the world, some is much safer and healthier to drink than others. Have you ever considered what might be in the water that comes from your tap?

Read on to learn how to assess your water safety and improve the drinking water in your home if necessary.

What’s In Your Water?

The best way to determine how safe the water in your home is is to purchase a water testing kit. They’re very inexpensive and test for all kinds of impurities:

water 199x300 Is Your Water Source Safe?

How well do you know your water?

  • bacteria
  • chemical content
  • fungi
  • VOCs
  • ideal pH level
  • Parasites

Improving Your Water Source

There are a number of ways you can go about improving the quality of the water your family has access to, on a range of budgets:

  • Purchase bottled water for drinking. It’s not eco-friendly, but in some cases the water quality might be better than what’s otherwise available.
  • Purchase a filtered water pitcher or container for drinking. This is a worthwhile solution for filtering out minor impurities.
  • Keep a Big Berkey water purifier. Popular with the “prepper” community, these systems can make even some of the dirtiest water drinkable. They are an investment, but one that is worth it.
  • Install filters on all your taps. They’ll filter out impurities right from the sink.
  • Install a whole-house water filtration system. Another large investment, this type of filter uses charcoal to filter out impurities and toxins to give you pure water from all your taps and faucets.

Ensuring safe, clean drinking water for your family is one of the most important things you can do for their health. Don’t delay – find out what’s really coming out of your pipes.

May Every Step You Take Be Healthy!

Best Regards,
Debbie Greenspan's signature
Debbie Estis Greenspan
Founder/CEO/Mom
Dr. Doormat, Inc.

7 Tips To Keeping The Car Clean

We practically live out of our cars.  

Here are 7 common sense tips for keeping the car clean.

Once upon a time in this great nation it was a luxury to own a car. When suburban sprawl, soccer games, cheerleading practice, football camp and sleepovers became the norm, what was a luxury became a necessity. While plenty of urban parents and children pack up equipment and coolers and take public transportation, the majority of the soccer moms are packing as many players as they can into their car-pooling auto.

 7 Tips To Keeping The Car Clean

Gearing up in the family SUV

The term auto is used loosely. More than likely the suburban mother of today is driving an SUV or van – the 2012 version of the old station wagon from the days of Leave it to Beaver. While fathers still drive their sporty cars to work, the work car is driven by the moms.

Whether a soccer mom or working person, we all seem to live in our cars. Think about all the time spent in stop and start commuting traffic. Then comes the taxi team hauling everyone and his brother to practices, recitals, play dates and maybe camping trips. Do not forget the daily trips to the super market, mall and big box stores. How does anyone make time for themselves? Usually, lunch time or break time means eating on the run.

 7 Tips To Keeping The Car Clean

The Family Taxi

How many carloads of rambunctious cheerleaders have passed through the Golden Arches after a game. After everyone orders their favorite super-sized meal and devours as much as possible while still talking and waving their arms around, there are more French fries on the floor of the car than ever hit the collective mouths. Mom ordered her favorite, too, which means not only fries on the floor, but spilled cola on the arm rest and crumbs down the front of her shirt.

This is life in America. We love it. So do all the germs and bacteria that hide in your car when you close the doors for the afternoon or evening. Your auto becomes a rolling lab specimen. In the hot, closed environment all the bad bacteria grow and flourish. And when the next person or group of children enters the car, they come in contact with all these vermin. Are the sniffles, flu bug or allergic reactions too far away?

It is virtually impossible for Americans to maintain the interior of their vehicles so they are germ free.   Here are 7 common sense ways to eliminate some of these invading microorganisms and viruses before they can do damage.

  1. You’ll need a garbage can, vacuum cleaner, paper towels, non-toxic, odor free cleaning spray and a litter-bag.
  2. Pull all the car mats out, shake and vacuum at least once a week and then believe it or not you should be able to wash those mats in a front-loading washing machine, and hang to dry.  Only as needed of course.
  3. Open all the doors, empty all the trash under all those seats and start cleaning.

     7 Tips To Keeping The Car Clean

    The cars takes a bath

  4. One major helpful tip:  Before and After you vacuum, clean the head of the vacuum cleaner with a sanitizing spray or solution.  This prevents the transfer of virus’s and other nasty germs from being spread around.   If you use a public car wash, make them use a spray or sanitizer or your car will be dirtier after they vacuum.
  5. Once a quarter have the floors shampooed at a professional car wash.
  6. Purchase a good size container of anti-bacterial wipes. Make it a game for the kids. Once they are secured in their seats have them wipe that portion of the seatbelts that they touch. They should also wipe the door handles before they touch them the first time. Don’t forget to wipe the steering wheel as well! Keep a litter-bag in the car for all the used wipes and pitch in the trash when you get home.
  7. Buy a large size container of anti-bacterial spray. You may wish to spray the seats and floors when you know the car will not be used any further for the day or evening. When you spray the interior and close the doors, while the car sits unused for seven hours, all the bacteria on the seats and floors will have been killed.  Air out in the morning before the family climbs aboard for another day.

You have not eliminated all the germs in the car, but you have made great strides in reducing your family’s exposure to harmful virus’s and toxins tracked in on our shoes.  It’s always a pleasure to drive a clean car.

May Every Step You Take Be Healthy!

Best Regards,
Debbie Greenspan's signature
Debbie Estis Greenspan
Founder/CEO/Mom
Dr. Doormat, Inc.